#ukgc19: Making More Time and Space to Think Betterer

The background

On the train, the night before. I have a few minutes in the carriage, among tourists’ oversized baggage and creaking fold-down tables, to work out a session for ukgovcamp 2019. A week-long Twitter poll indicated that people were interested in how to stop and think, which is something I’ve been not-stopping about recently, but have been doing a lot of thinking about. I wrote down in my notebook.

The session

I had one of the first sessions on the almighty matrix of time and thought.

“Permission”

The notion of Permission came up a few times, which I noted down with a bubbly squiggle round it. “Giving permission to yourself” came up a bit — and this forged on into what it means to be part of a team with expectations about how we work. We are, fundamentally, social creatures. It can often feel self-indulgent, almost arrogant, to give yourself some space and time. Like you’re taking a break, like you’re slacking. Apparently, in the 21st knowledge-worker economy, you’re only productive if you’re typing, or in a room with somebody else.

Cultural values

This idea of “permission” seemed to tie directly in with the values that an organisation has. In any organisation, how people communicate, and what people expect from each other, will emerge from a variety of factors, from the building itself to the organisation’s brand, and also — obviously — from how the people in the group choose to interact with each other, or think they should. If the organisation lead, whoever that is and how they got there, seems to value “busy-ness”, then it is a struggle to go against that.

(In)visible Labour

Returning to this idea of visibility, I was (and am) very interested to explore how we could value thinking time more. As one session attendee noted, if you’re by yourself, but at least drawing on bits of paper, it makes it look like you’re doing something.

Where next?

Well, first up, massive thanks to all the attendees and note-takers who came along and made it a great session. Someone came up to me in the pub after and said it was their best session of the day, which made me smile A LOT.

Resources

Here’s a list of potentially useful resources, some from the session, some from after, and some from my memory:

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Graham

Graham

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Lead tech at OCSI, making data friendly for social good. Likes words. Doesn't really own a bowler hat.